Scott Adam’s Golden Age Fallacy (The Great Stagnation, Part 1)

This is the first in a series I'm calling The Great Stagnation, a concept I took from Peter Thiel. Thiel argues that the rate of technological progress in the western world has stagnated. This post is reacting to a book by Scott Adams, Loserthink, which wasn't very good. One particularly dumb chapter is called, "The Golden … Continue reading Scott Adam’s Golden Age Fallacy (The Great Stagnation, Part 1)

More about barriers to entry: How people get rich

This post will follow up on a previous one about anti-trust. In that post, I allege that the best (if not only) way to become aggressively rich — to have “passive income” — is to abuse some “barrier to entry.” A barrier to entry is essentially some leverage that makes it very difficult for someone else to compete with … Continue reading More about barriers to entry: How people get rich

A proposal for a better standard of anti-trust

Anti-trust origins Anti-trust regulations are called that because they were once considered generically anti-corporate regulations, like what tough-on-corporation politicians expound today. Think the trusts are oppressing the workers? Hit them with some regulations! But eventually, anti-trust would come to by synonymous with curbing the power of monopoly. And with good reason. Market power is the … Continue reading A proposal for a better standard of anti-trust

Proper Sovereignty Manifesto, Part 4: Currency

According to this manifesto, there exactly four functions of government: To protect people's health and property To oversee natural utilities, and one-of-a-kind goods (these topics are related via Georgism) To neutrally promote the creation and availability of information To maintain a national currency This section will cover #4. After this post, the manifesto will have … Continue reading Proper Sovereignty Manifesto, Part 4: Currency

Proper Sovereignty Manifesto, Part 2: Georgism

Time has not treated Henry George well. He was the most famous economist in the world. In 1906, his books were more well known than Shakespeare’s plays, even among the members of the British Parliament. It goes without saying that he was the best-selling American writer of his era. About 200,000 people attended his funeral. … Continue reading Proper Sovereignty Manifesto, Part 2: Georgism