A proposal for a better standard of anti-trust

Anti-trust origins Anti-trust regulations are called that because they were once considered generically anti-corporate regulations, like what tough-on-corporation politicians expound today. Think the trusts are oppressing the workers? Hit them with some regulations! But eventually, anti-trust would come to by synonymous with curbing the power of monopoly. And with good reason. Market power is the … Continue reading A proposal for a better standard of anti-trust

Irreversible Fads vs The Precautionary Principle

Of the two greatest sources of knowledge for how society should function, the first is tradition. After all, if a norm has has been practiced for countless generations, doesn’t that count for something? The modern man may scoff at this. Why should we defer to the way people have done things in the past? Tradition … Continue reading Irreversible Fads vs The Precautionary Principle

Speech: Peter Thiel on predicting the future

The penultimate speech: You Are Not a Lottery Ticket by Peter Thiel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZM_JmZdqCw The question of luck Thiel believes there are two forces of progress. First, globalization (horizontal progress), copying things that already work, or "doing more with more". Second, technology (vertical progress), doing things a different way, or "doing more with less." Globalization is mathematically represented … Continue reading Speech: Peter Thiel on predicting the future

The errors with Bret Weinstein’s four-part test of adaption

A biologist I admire, Bret Weinstein, employs a four-part test to determine whether a trait is the product of evolution. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtdOhBoZfNg Is it complex? Does it have a cost? Is there variation in the amount of cost that is spent? Does it persist over evolutionary time? If a trait has all of those characteristics, then … Continue reading The errors with Bret Weinstein’s four-part test of adaption